Employer Visit: LSC Communications

Representatives from LSC Communications will be at both lunches on Thursday, Dec. 6 to discuss temporary employment opportunities for students at least 18 years of age, beginning this holiday season.

Great opportunity to make a little extra money while on break!

What to Wear to an Interview

By Alison Doyle, The Balance Careers

Most high school job seekers aren’t interviewing for professional positions. Instead, they’re usually looking for part-time jobs in retail, restaurants, babysitting, or even applying for volunteer positions. Accordingly, a teen’s interview attire doesn’t have to be exceedingly formal. In fact, a teen would look pretty silly in a full-blown business suit.

After submitting your resume, you will—hopefully—get a call back to schedule an interview. But, as is the case with any ​interview, it’s important to look well dressed and put together.

Choose Appropriate Interview Attire

When you’re dressing for a job interview, your clothing should be in good condition, wrinkle-free and, of course, work-place appropriate. Because a teen’s level of maturity is a significant factor for employers looking to hire young people, it’s especially important that teens dress modestly and tastefully.

Button-Down With Dark Slacks or Khakis

While high school job interviews generally don’t require formal clothing, it’s still important for teens to look well-dressed. A  button-down with a tasteful plaid pattern is a good choice for both young men and women, as it’s a look that appears properly put-together, but still relaxed and laid back. Paired with khakis, it’s the perfect choice for a first interview.

Polo Shirt With a Skirt or Slacks

A nice polo shirt is a fine choice for a high school job interview, especially if you’re applying for a summer job or interviewing in warm weather. Because it’s a more casual choice, though, make sure your pants or skirt make up for it. For example, choose khakis, not jeans, or tuck it into a modest-length skirt.

Button-Down With a Sweater and Khakis

A layered button-down, sweater, and khakis are a great option for an interview that might require dressier attire, but not something so formal as a blazer and tie. In fact, this look is a great one to have on hand in the closet, as it’s versatile enough that it’s appropriate for both casual and formal situations. Plus, having a few different sweaters and button-downs to combine in different ways also means you’ll automatically have an effortless selection of multiple interview outfits.

Polo Shirt With Dark Slacks or Khakis

Polo shirts work for boys, too. Even a “preppy” look bodes well for an interview. Remember to round off the look with something a little dressier, like a pair of pressed khakis, for example. And, both young men and women should take care to avoid sneakers or sandals! A pair of penny loafers or brown dress shoes would be a great way to finish off the outfit.

Button-Down With a Cardigan

Young women can opt for a button-down, too. Paired with a bright accessory to liven it up, the outfit is classic but contemporary. In this case, navy blue pants provide the finishing touch, but the ensemble would also work well with khaki pants or a skirt, too.

Dress Shirt and Slacks

A simple dress shirt is a perfect choice for a high school job interview. Paired with khakis, dark slacks, or maybe even tailored darkish jeans, it’s a look that is mature and tasteful, but still comfortable. But, without the addition of a tie, a blazer, or a sweater, it’s important that the shirt be stain-free, ironed and tucked in, so it doesn’t look like a random old button-down grabbed last minute from the back of a closet.

A Tie Can Make a Great Impression

Just because high school job interviews tend to be more casual, you don’t have to rule out a tie! After all, looking a little dressed up never hurt anyone. A solid button-down and conservative striped tie can be a great a choice for a young man looking to make a good impression. You could roll your sleeves to make the outfit feel just a bit more casual, rather than stuffy.

What Not to Wear

Your shoes should be moderate and you should avoid extreme hairstyles or colors. Also, keep makeup and perfume to a minimum. No jeans or shorts, no tank tops, crop tops, or anything especially low cut (shirt or pants) or too short (skirt or blouse)—keeping everything professional is a must.

LSC Communications

LSC Communications will be at both lunch periods on Monday, May 21 to promote summer employment and full-time opportunities.

The Maschhoffs

The Maschoffs will be at both lunch periods on Monday, May 21 to promote summer employment and full-time opportunities.

Help Wanted

Are you still on the hunt for a summer job? Are you graduating next week, and ready to start a career immediately? Then don’t miss these new opportunities for Southmont students!

On Monday, May 21, two local industries will be at both A &B Lunches to promote their employment opportunities, and to recruit YOU! Be sure to visit the representatives from:

  • LSC Communications for more information on their summer help and their entry-level manufacturing jobs
  • The Maschoffs for information on their entry-level hog production positions, and their veterinary science internships

Additionally, SIX new job openings have been posted on the Job Board since last week. Check them out!

Need help with your resume? Not sure how to write that first email to an employer? Want to practice your interview? Then plan to visit Mrs. Cotten in the Guidance Office for more help.

 

How to Find a Great Summer Job

(Don’t Forget! All students must have a work permit for summer jobs. You can pick up the forms from Mrs. Watson in the front office.)

Summer break is a great time to earn money for college. But a summer job or internship can provide you with much more, such as an opportunity to get work experience and gain new skills. You may even discover your future career.

To find a summer job that suits you, try these tips.

Think about your goals

Do you need to earn some money? Want to develop a specific skill? Hope to explore a career you have an interest in? Figuring out what you want to get out of your summer work experience will help focus your job search.

Tap into your connections

To start your search, talk with those around you. Tell family, friends, teachers, school counselors or your College & Career Readiness Coach that you want to work and explain what you’re looking for. They can give you advice and may be able to put you in touch with people who can help you find a job. Southmont High School even has a new job and internship board with listings for student employment (Click Job Board in the top navigation).

Find local resources

You can often find local employers online or by asking around your neighborhood. Stores and restaurants often hire younger workers. And places like parks and swimming pools often need help for the summer.

Graduating in May, and want to make good money before college? Consider summer employment in manufacturing!

Want to learn something specific, like what lawyers do all day? Give local law firms a call and ask if they need help.

Become an entrepreneur

Start your own business using your skills and experience. If you’re good with animals, you could offer a dog-walking service. If you’re a math whiz, you could tutor younger kids. Want to enjoy the outdoors? Start a lawn-mowing business. Talk to relatives, neighbors and friends and see if you can find a few clients before summer starts. Remember, though, being your own boss is a lot of work.

Volunteer your skills

Volunteering for a local charity or community group is a great way to learn about yourself and others. Whatever your interest, there’s probably an organization that fits. If you love plants, help out in a community garden. If you’re a good writer, volunteer for a tutoring program for kids who need help.


Your summer break can be a great time to explore potential careers. For tips on how to get to know yourself for career planning, read
5 Ways to Find Career Ideas.

Still need help? See Mrs. Cotten in the Guidance Office for more information.


Content Credit: My Big Future