How to Find a Great Summer Job

(Don’t Forget! All students must have a work permit for summer jobs. You can pick up the forms from Mrs. Watson in the front office.)

Summer break is a great time to earn money for college. But a summer job or internship can provide you with much more, such as an opportunity to get work experience and gain new skills. You may even discover your future career.

To find a summer job that suits you, try these tips.

Think about your goals

Do you need to earn some money? Want to develop a specific skill? Hope to explore a career you have an interest in? Figuring out what you want to get out of your summer work experience will help focus your job search.

Tap into your connections

To start your search, talk with those around you. Tell family, friends, teachers, school counselors or your College & Career Readiness Coach that you want to work and explain what you’re looking for. They can give you advice and may be able to put you in touch with people who can help you find a job. Southmont High School even has a new job and internship board with listings for student employment (Click Job Board in the top navigation).

Find local resources

You can often find local employers online or by asking around your neighborhood. Stores and restaurants often hire younger workers. And places like parks and swimming pools often need help for the summer.

Graduating in May, and want to make good money before college? Consider summer employment in manufacturing!

Want to learn something specific, like what lawyers do all day? Give local law firms a call and ask if they need help.

Become an entrepreneur

Start your own business using your skills and experience. If you’re good with animals, you could offer a dog-walking service. If you’re a math whiz, you could tutor younger kids. Want to enjoy the outdoors? Start a lawn-mowing business. Talk to relatives, neighbors and friends and see if you can find a few clients before summer starts. Remember, though, being your own boss is a lot of work.

Volunteer your skills

Volunteering for a local charity or community group is a great way to learn about yourself and others. Whatever your interest, there’s probably an organization that fits. If you love plants, help out in a community garden. If you’re a good writer, volunteer for a tutoring program for kids who need help.


Your summer break can be a great time to explore potential careers. For tips on how to get to know yourself for career planning, read
5 Ways to Find Career Ideas.

Still need help? See Mrs. Cotten in the Guidance Office for more information.


Content Credit: My Big Future

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *